A Study of Aboriginal Youth Gangs

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1960-1970|
Timeline|
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11/2/2011|

Table of Contents
Introduction......................................................................................................................................3 1960: Lost Children.........................................................................................................................3 1960-1962: Political Growth............................................................................................................5 1962-1964: Poverty on the Rise.......................................................................................................6 1964: Growth and Development......................................................................................................6 1965: Recognition for our Nation....................................................................................................6 1966 - 1967: Centennial and Capital Punishment............................................................................7 1968: Aboriginals and Gangs...........................................................................................................8 1969-1970: The White and Red Paper.............................................................................................9 Conclusion.....................................................................................................................................10 Bibliography..................................................................................................................................12

Introduction
The era that we chose was the 1960-1970. The significant events that took place and that will be discussed are the “60’s scoop”, the Native Brotherhood, A study of Aboriginal Youth Gangs and the Red and White Papers. These events in particular gave Aboriginals a strong voice, provided leadership and allowed the rest of Canada to try and understand the reasoning why First Nations people intend on keeping their culture alive, building solidarity and forcing the government to keep their promises. Although the time frame was early and not all Aboriginal archives were kept; the interviews and legislation were enough for keep the policies from being swept under the carpet from taped media coverage. The start of the decade marked the loss of aboriginal children and a whole generation of culture. 1960: Lost Children

The beginning of the 1960’s in American Culture was one of the defining times in its nation. It appeared the citizens had found their voice and where not afraid to use it. Protests, marches and organized groups were formed and they propelled their causes into the public spotlight. In Canada we had yet to find our voice. 1960 began with the phenomenon know known as the “60’s Scoop”. This was the removal of aboriginal children from their homes and communities through Child Services. The children were placed in non-native homes out of province and even out of country. They were either adopted out or lost in the system of crown wards. It is an estimated that 20,000 aboriginal children were taken from their families and fostered or adopted out to primary white middle-class families. To many of those communities of lost children, this was seen as a form of cultural genocide (Pan, 2009). The lost children had no one to learn their culture from and were typically forced or choose out of lack of options to adopt the new families’ religious rites and customs. This form of genocide spanned from 1960- mid 1980’s. The term “60’s scoop was coined by Patrick Johnson; it is a term now deeply rooted in the Canadian definitions. The 60’s scoop affected both Native communities and non Native communities. (Government, 1999) The native community not only lost a child but they lost an important part of their future. Children are seen as having great connection to the spiritual world but without the proper guidance that connection can be...
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