A Separate Peace Essay

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 680
  • Published : August 23, 2005
Open Document
Text Preview
A Separate Peace Essay
In the novel, A Separate Peace by John Knowles, the protagonist, Gene Forrester "battled" within himself to find "a separate peace" and in this process directed his emotions at Phineas, his roommate. Forrester and Phineas formed the illusion of a great companionship, but there was a "silent rivalry" between them in Forrester's mind. Self deceptions in Forrester led him to believe that Phineas was "out to get him" (Forrester). Subconsciously Forrester jounced the limb of the tree and forced Phineas to fall and break his leg. Phineas found out the truth of his "accident" with the help of Leper Lepellier and Brinker Hadley, who were friends that attended Devon High School. Gene Forrester's conflict between his resentment of and loyalty toward Phineas' personality and athletic abilities was resolved by the death of Phineas. Gene Forrester and Phineas formed an illusion of a great companionship, which was sincere when they jumped from the "forbidden" tree. "We were the best of friends at that moment," said Forrester when he remembered the instant (Knowles 10). Forrester "looked deeper" into his relationship with Phineas and became jealous of his talents, "I was beginning to see that Phineas could get away with anything. I couldn't help envying that a little, which was perfectly normal" (18). A "silent rivalry" was developed between Forrester and in his mind Phineas. Forrester attempted to become "better" than Phineas by studying more and maintaining a higher average between his academic and athletic abilities as opposed to his rival, "Phineas was without question the best athlete, so in that way we were even. But while he was a very poor student I was a pretty good athlete, and when everything was thrown into the scales they would in the end tilt definitely toward me (Forrester,)" (47). The "rivalry" inside Forrester led him to believe that Phineas had these feelings of resentment toward him (Forrester,) and was also...
tracking img