A Rewiew of a Rose

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Tiffany Gattis
Tavel
ENG 151
05 Oct 2012

A Review of a Rose
“A Rose for Emily”, by William Faulkner is a riveting tale of the perils of love lost. Though the story offers up an elaborate plot, the conclusion did not fully provide closure as would be the natural expectation. Instead, the conclusion was heavily shrouded in mystery and secrecy. “Miss Emily after Dark”, by Thomas Robert Argiro, which was published in The Mississippi Quarterly, discusses the many obscurities within the story and the effects of them remaining so right up to the conclusion with relation to the reader. Laura J. Getty’s critical essay,” Faulkner’s A Rose for Emily” touches on the manner in which these obscurities evoke sensationalism among readers by leaving room for the imagination to run wild with approximation. This is what great stories are built on; allowing each reader perceptive resolution.

According to Dictionary.com, the word conclusion is defined as the last main division of discourse, usually containing a summary of the main points and a statement of opinion or decisions reached. There is, by definition, a sense of finality in the word. Despite the suggested intent, not all stories provide this presumed closure. Among the many tales ending in such a manner is Faulkner’s masterfully crafted “A Rose for Emily”; a story set in a small, post World War II southern town struggling with post-war socio-economic transformations. The conclusion of this ominous tale allows the readers imagination the freedom to supplement omitted details with personally palatable concepts. Among the central yet under-developed themes were Emily’s relationships with her father, the surrounding community, and her assumed lover, Homer Barron.

The relationship between Emily and her father, as described by Faulkner, leaves the reader pondering what, and exactly how much was left unsaid, and the possible implications as they relate to the proverbial white space of the story. “The...
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