A Raisin in the Sun and I Have a Dream

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I Have a Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr. and A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry. There are three similarities between these two works. Both works discuss segregation, protest not becoming violent, and keeping the dream of equality alive.

In Raisin in the Sun, Linder says, “It is a matter of the people of Clybourne Park believing, rightly or wrongly, as I say that for the happiness of all concerned that our Negro families are happier when they live in their own communities.” King says, “One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.” They both discuss that whites will not let blacks integrate with them. King says, “I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream.” Beneatha says, “Because it doesn’t seem deep enough, close enough to what ails mankind! It was a child’s way of seeing things – or an idealist’s.” They both have dreams and seem idealistic even though it might be hard to accomplish. Walter says, “Never mind how I feel – you got any more to say ‘bout how people ought to sit down and talk to each other?...Get out of my house, man.” King says, “We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence.” They protest verbally instead of using violence.

These quotes support the similarities in the two works. These are the three similarities: both discuss fighting for racial integration, maintaining peace during protest, and following a dream that seems impossible.
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