A Passage to India: Culture Clash

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CONTEXT
British context
Forster was a British writer and most of his readers were British. His work reflects also England and the period in which Forster lived and wrote. He is commonly regarded as an Edwardian novelist, because his first four novels were published during the reign of King Edward VII (1901-1910); in this period his values and outlook were developed. England had undergone the traumatic experience of the First World War; more than 750000 soldiers were killed, along with another million from other parts of British Empire. Between 1912 and 1924, the British policy had also changed: there were two main parties, the Liberal and the Conservative. British Empire was changing. The change was more evident in Ireland. Ireland gained the indipendence in 1921.

KEY POINTS
FULL TITLE: “A Passage to India”
AUTHOR: Edward Morgan Forster
TYPE OF WORK: Novel
TIME AND PLACE WRITTEN: 1912-1924 England
DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: 1924
TENSE: Past
THEMES: Culture Clash; Friendship; Ambiguity; Religion
CHARACTERS: Dr Aziz, Mr Fielding, Adela Quested, Mrs. Moore, Ronny Healsop SETTING ( TIME ): 1910s or 1920s
SETTING ( PLACE ): India, specifically the cities of Chandrapore and Mau. Carico...
CHARACTERS
Dr Aziz
Is the central Indian character in the novel.
He works at the government hospital in Chandrapore.
He writes poetry and his favorite poetic themes are: the Decay of Islam and the brevity of Love. He’s described as a true “Oriental” person.
He’s very goodwill and his impulsive nature get him into situations that cause him trouble. Like many of his friends prefers to communicte throught confidences, underlying words and indirect speech Like many other Indians struggles with the problem of the English in India.

CHARACTERS
Mr Fielding
The principal of the Government College (that is, a British−run school) in Chandrapore. He has "no racial feeling“.
He’s far and away most the successful at developing relationships with native Indians. He’s less comfortable in teacher – student interaction than he is in one -on- one conversation with another individual Serves as Forster’s model of liberal humanism.

At the and of the novel Forster seems to identify with Fielding less.

CHARACTERS
Adela Quested
Her character develops in parallel to Mrs Moore’s one
She’s an individual and educated free thinker
Adela hopes to see the “real India”
She puts her mind to the task, but not her heart and therfore never connects with Indians.

CHARACTERS
Mrs. Moore
Mrs. Moore serves a double function in “A Passage to India” She’s initially a literal character.
She becomes more a symbolic presence.
The solution to the problem in India.
Her name becomes more associeted with Hinduism
She’s the heroine of the novel

CHARACTERS
Ronny Heaslop
Forster ‘s emphasis is on the change that happened, when Ronny first arrived in India. Ronny’s character is a sort of case, an exploration of the restrictions of English colonial. Ronny’s tastes, opinions and even his manner of speaking are no longer his own, but those of older, ostensibly wiser British Indian officials. Clash with both Adela and his mother, Mrs. Moore.

CHARACTERS
There are also some characters that are less important that the previous and are: Mahmoud Ali: a Moslem and a close friend of Dr Aziz.
Major Callender: the head of the government hospital in Chandrapore. Professor Godbole: an Indian who teaches at the college of Chandrapore. Hamidullah: a Moslem, educated at Cambridge University.

Mr. McBride: the district superintendent of police in Chadrapore. Carico...
DEEPENING ON FEMALE CHARACTERS
Adela Quested
A young Englishwoman who comes to India With Mrs. Moore.
She is expected to marry Mrs. Moore's son Ronny Heaslop.
Her behavior radically affects the lives of the characters around her. On a symbolic level, Adela may also represent most people's inability to communicate or to understand the...
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