A Narrative of the American War for Independence

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A Narrative of the American War for Independence

Written by: Justin Mikesell

The American Revolution was a long, painful, bloody, war. Up until this time nothing had ever been seen of such proportions on American soil. The outset of this event would change life drastically around the world. The outcome would determine trade, the way war was waged, it would hurt the pride of a might nation and a new nation would be formed with a resolve like none other before her. With all of these one would wonder how could this happen? What occurred during this time that made these changes take place? Who was involved and what happened?

First of all, from the outset this new land was founded by people with dislike and disgust for the British Empire. They wanted nothing to do with their intolerance. England had oppressed them for religious reasons as in the case of the separatists and puritans. Some such as the Scotch-Irish had been moved around from place to place by England and never really found a home. They became some of our earliest pioneers pushing the boundaries of our country. Others such as indentured servants had more promise and opportunity with a free ride in turn for several years of work.

With all sorts of people coming into their colonies, England started to become very nervous about colonial government. Restrictions began to be emplaced on them with little effect. Laws and restriction just seemed to aggravate the colonists. They were being taxed increasingly without representation, without protection, and with abuse of their “God given rights” to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. By the end of the French and Indian War and the end of events such as the Boston Massacre and Tea Party the nation was in open rebellion and flagrantly exposing their dislike for England. The Revolution was just around the corner.

The First Day of the War was marked with a shot that has become famously known as the “Shot Heard Around the World”. In April 1775 troops were sent to the town of Lexington to capture large stores of weapons and the Rebel Samuel Adams and John Hancock. The “Shot” was fired and a massacre took place. Next the British were on to concord they were to see this unsightly outburst of rebellion against the crown to the finish. They moved of Concord in force but were met by fierce resistance by the Colonial Minute Men who had gathered from all around after hearing about this upset. They took this matter into their own hands stood up and pushed the British back causing 300 English casualties.

Soon after, Congress had to reconvene, since things had obviously not gotten better. They now had a dilemma there was a Revolution on their hands but could they really stand up against their Mother Country? There was much debate over this but as John Adams has said, “The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people”. This thing was inevitable but one last plea had to be made, hence the “Olive Branch Petition” was drafted and sent the England as an army was being raised under the appointed George Washington. Ben Franklyn was sent to Paris to enlist the French in our aid.

Our hope for freedom, George Washington was now in charge. Under his command was “not an army but a gaggle” as the History Channel put it. He was left with troops that had no experience whatsoever. There had never been an army before. Before the Revolution there was just the British. No system was in place there was limited ways of supplying the troops. Washington may have been in over his head, but what could he do? He had to push on training troops in rudimentary things and meticulously establishing the fighting force that would win the Revolution.

Meanwhile, the men of Boston were left to themselves with the immediate problem of thousands of English militants blockading their city’s harbor. The Battle...
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