A Game of Polo with a Headless Goat - Anthology Text

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A Game of Polo with a Headless Goat - Anthology Text

By | March 2013
Page 1 of 3
How does the writer attempt to share her experiences of being at the races?

Emma Levine, the writer of this travelogue; “A Game of Polo With a Headless Goat”, adequately shares her experiences with the reader through a number of stylistic techniques which captivate the reader into believing the experiences Levine had while she was at the donkey races, a common communal sport in Pakistan.

The passage initially beings with a sense of pace - as the writer is already commuting to the scene of the race without any previous explanation as to why she is going to this race and who she is with – or who the accompanying “lads” are. This adds to the excitement of the race as it seems as though travelling to the race was a spontaneous decision between them, creating somewhat a jokey attitude towards the day, as the reader is given the impression that the characters are light-hearted and looking forward to the race.

Furthermore, the two opening paragraphs are positive and humorous as Levine juxtaposes the adrenaline and 'hype' of the race as her and “the lads” are anxiously anticipating the pending race, as their equipment has been prepared. This is then funnily juxtaposed when the highly anticipated race is expected, and the “only action” is a “villager on a wobbly bicycle”. This anecdote comforts the reader as they are starting to become more aware of the fact that the situation is somewhat “silly” and “childish” - though this could also be construed as the team are also somewhat unprepared and unorganised. Levine could also be juxtaposing the difference in culture that Levine is yet to become accustomed too. Similarly, the man on the bicycle also has not been accustomed to the fact that the team are not used to the “Western” world.

The “wobbly bicycle”adds to the humour as the tension is increased for the reader as they continue to wait for the action. Also, the use of repetition “coming... coming” is used to build the anticipation, and the complex sentences...