A Critical Analysis of a Google; a Net-Enabled E-Business.

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 233
  • Published : March 29, 2009
Open Document
Text Preview
A Critical Analysis of a Google; a net-enabled e-business.

Contents
1.0Abstract3

2.0Background of Google3

3.0E-Business Model3

3. 1 Mission4

3.2 Structure5

3.3 Processes5

3.4 Revenues6

3.5 Legal issues7

3.6 Technology7

4.0 Competitive Analysis8

4.1 SWOT Analysis8

4. 2 Strengths8

4.3Weaknesses10

4.4Opportunities10

4.5Threats11

5.0 Google’s Strategy12

5.1 Diversification12

5.2 Innovation13

5.3 Emergent14

6.0 Conclusion15

7.0 References16

Abstract

This essay will firstly look at a brief overview of Google and its history. It will then use Alt and Zimmerman’s (1991) Generic Elements of Business model to discuss the structure and processes of Google. Next it will provide a competitive analysis of Google before focusing on the strategies employed by Google. Finally it will reflect on the analysis covered and provide conclusions.

Background of Google

Google was created by Larry Page and Sergey Brinn. They first developed a search engine called BackRub in 1996, and after further development incorporated Google in 1998. Today Google is one of the top internet search engines in the world; according to Nielsen NetRatings, in July 2006; 49.2% of all US internet searches were done using Google’s search engine. Although Google is predominately known for its search engine, it provides a range of other services including Google Earth, Google Groups and Google Calendar (see diagram 1). DataMonitor (2007) states that “Google maintains an index of websites and other content, and makes this information freely available to anyone with an Internet connection. Its automated search technology enables people to obtain nearly instant access to relevant information from its online index. The company’s innovations in web search and advertising have made its web site a top internet destination and its brand one of the most recognized in the world” (pg.4).

E-Business Model

Alt and Zimmermann (1991) ‘Generic Elements of Business’ model (Figure 1). This business model is useful as it highlights the six key elements needed to support any business idea. Using this model I will evaluate Google’s business model. [pic]

3. 1 Mission
The mission of a company is one of the core elements of the business model, as it clearly defines the overall aims and objectives, as well as stating the vision and strategic goals of the business. Google’s mission is:

“To organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.” (Google Annual Report, 2007, p.15)
Google’s Key Strategic Goals are:
• “We will do our best to provide the most relevant and useful search results possible, independent of financial incentives.” • “We will do our best to provide the most relevant and useful advertising. Advertisements should not be an annoying interruption.” • “We will never stop working to improve our user experience, our search technology and other important areas of information organisation.” (Google Annual Report, 2007, p.15)

Google is a play on the word ‘Googol’ which is a mathematical term that refers to 1 followed by 100zeros. Google's play on this word “reflects the company's mission to organize the immense amount of information available on the web” (Google.co.uk, 2007). Overall aims and Objectives:

Google aims to provide a high level of service to all users who seek information. To maintain this Google continuously pursues innovation and development of technologies. According to their website Google is committed to creating and developing the ‘perfect search engine’. 3.2 Structure

The structure of Google’s business reflects its overall mission and key strategic goals. Google is a public and profitable business that is focused on search services. Google serves three primary market segments: end users, advertisers, and partner web sites (Hummer et al, 2006). Google “maintains an...
tracking img