A Christmas Carol - Description of Scrooge

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The true description of Scrooge first appears about quarter way through the book, before then there are only a few minor references to his character. The description begins metaphorically as it features the words " A tight-fisted hand at the grindstone". Its metaphorical because it is trying to portray that Scrooge is literally as tight as the hand to the grindstone. Then soon after this seven adjectives follow, " Squeezing, Wrenching, Grasping, Scraping, Clutching, Covetous, Old sinner". They are used effectively as each one has an individual meaning describing seven trates of Scrooges character, which begins to give the reader a visual picture of how the character may conduct himself. So far all qualities of Scrooge have been negative and so it continues. Then the writer brings in the object "flint" and states all the negative quality's of flint then compares them to Scrooge.

As soon as the writer gets across the way in which Scrooge conducts himself, he moves on to how Scrooge is happy to be by himself. Charles Dickens uses the word "Solitary" to great effect as it portrays that not only Scrooge stays alone it also gives a second meaning. It's as if that Scrooge does not need anyone else. Then Charles Dickens attempts to compare Scrooge to the weather making him a very cold hearted character, and explains that even the worse weather can not match to how cold Scrooge is and how he cares not for anyone but himself. It mentions "The cold within him froze his facial features", so it portrays that its not the weather affecting Scrooge its how cold he is inside. Its even to the extent that its as if Scrooge carries around a low temperature with him where ever he goes. Its not a physical effect he has, its more of a visual effect as whenever anyone would see him they would experience chills down the back of his neck.

Scrooge is a very powerful character as whenever Charles Dickens attempts to describe him he uses words that seem to carry a visual...
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