A Boys Besy Friend - White Stripes. Concept of Belonging

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: The White Stripes, Fear, Sentence
  • Pages : 3 (959 words )
  • Download(s) : 968
  • Published : December 3, 2010
Open Document
Text Preview
A Boy’s Best Friend
-White Stripes

- Released – June 20, 2000
- Recorded – 1999; Third Man Studio, Detroit, Michigan

I just don't fit in this place
their thoughts cast me out of here
their home has run out of space
my mind's already out of here
won't you come along dear?
won't you come along?

words that are spoke alone
phrases you will never hear
empty rooms and a telephone
that i will never use, never fear
I am all alone dear
I am all alone

My dogs come sit next to me
a pack of dogs and cigarettes
my only friends speak no words to me
but they look at me
and they don't forget
that a boy's best friend is his mother
or whatever has become his pet

The purpose of the White Stripes song “A boy’s best friend” is to characterize the social anxiety that a ‘boy’ goes through. The point that the composer is trying to emphasise, is that even though people will have their ‘friends around’ them, their best friend will be the mother that birthed them or their dog that can not speak. A technique such as talking to a second person in the lyrics allows the audience to feel included, asking them rhetorical questions that are repeated. In the first verse, the composer justifies significantly that they do not ‘fit in this place’ and exclaims that ‘their thoughts cast me out/their home has run out of space’. This shows that they feel that they do not belong where they are, they do not feel the comfortable essence that they should and they feel out casted from their home. ‘Home’ could mean the group of people they are around, or even the town/country/community they’re in. ‘My mind’s already out here’ could mean that they can’t extinguish what they have said, that they’ve already made the decision that they will leave. The audience is then added with the technique of repetitive questions, asking if they would ‘come along’. ‘empty rooms and a telephone/that I will never use, never fear’ is a use of hyperbole, exclaiming that they will ‘never’ use those...
tracking img