Zoning and Eminent Domain

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  • Topic: Property, Kelo v. City of New London, Eminent domain
  • Pages : 4 (1411 words )
  • Download(s) : 50
  • Published : March 25, 2013
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Zoning and eminent Domain:
Land use planning law involves governmental real existence using the government power to regulate and control the use and development of a property, often to protect natural resources or the population or densities of an area or to reduce conflicts between the landowners. Zoning is one type of land use planning in which a local government designates areas for specific uses, such as single-family housing or industrial zones. Usually zoning is controlled by local government such as countries or municipalities. Eminent domain is one tool governmental entities may use to further their land use planning goals, in that the government may seize property or property rights, with due monetary compensation, for public use. The property is taken either for government use or by the commission to the other parties, who will assign it to civil use, public use or county’s economy development. Usually the property taken by government by using the eminent domain is for government buildings, public school, highway, railroads. “Zoning is the system of developing a city or county plan in which various geographic areas (zones) are restricted to certain uses and development, such as industrial, light industrial, commercial, light-commercial, agricultural, single-family residential, multi-unit residential, parks, schools, and other purposes.”( dictionary of Law and Business).Zoning is the main planning system of local government such as counties to guide the future development of a community, protect neighborhoods, concentrate retail business and industry, channel traffic, and play a major role in the enhancement of urban economy, as well as small-town life. In 1926 zoning was declared constitutional by the U. S. Supreme Court. By zoning Government divide a town, city, village, or county into separate residential, commercial, and industrial districts, thereby protecting the desirable characteristics of each type of setting. These laws generally limit...
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