Youth & Piracy

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Piracy has taken a big impact in our today’s Moroccan society. This impact is so big that some of us ask ourselves how come people that commit piracy are working by themselves and are self-made people, somehow engineers. This act has taken a so large influence that it has become a common and usual action. The question that might be asked is do they really know what piracy is? Indeed, for some, many tend to think that the simple act of copying is not considered as pirating. In fact, piracy is when you use unlicensed software or a part of it for any kind of use, and consequently prohibit its authors from earning money from it. One of the biggest today’s problems in our Kingdom is that this informal sector is driving Morocco in a tremendous loss in terms of economy and integrity at a global scale. Unfortunately, youngsters are grandly responsible of many forms of piracy such as illegal downloads and/or software copying. In the meanwhile, is the average Moroccan ready to afford authentic software at a relatively high price? Whatever the answer might be, there is absolutely no reason for anyone to commit piracy, and one should greatly be submitted to severe penalties because it is of course in part because of piracy that our country’s economic health is affected. But why do we commit piracy, and what can be done to decrease the impact of this phenomenon.

One of the first questions people should ask themselves is why do Moroccans and/or others commit acts of piracy almost every single day? Why does the phenomenon’s expansion seem unstoppable, despite Morocco’s fight against piracy placed as one of its top priorities? In fact, the phenomenon is still getting bigger and bigger due to the unstoppable progress of technology. Our country is still losing over the equivalent of over 200 Million US Dollars. Many good development aspects of Morocco have given the great chance and opportunity to piracy to experience an incredible level of growth. Indeed, according to the International Intellectual Property Alliance (IIPA), Morocco “has emerged as one of the fastest growing broadband Internet markets in the world, growing at a rate of 200% by adding a total of 135,000 DSL lines in the first three quarters of 2005, for a total installed base of 179,000 lines Special 301.” Given these evolutions, specific measures should have been taken because the “e-pirate” is in the Internet just like a fish is in the water. Thanks to the growing number of Internet lines and their bandwidth, piracy is almost in one of its best environment to evolve. Moreover, youngsters seem to enjoy this evolution as they are the ones who commit acts of piracy every day. Indeed, the less time the user needs to wait for an illegal copy to be downloaded, the more he will be encouraged to download. Moreover, the more Internet lines, the more the number of downloads. Indeed, due to these performances, “the recording industry noted that Morocco has the dubious distinction of being in first place in the Middle East and North Africa region in terms of music piracy. The recording industry estimated the music piracy rate in Morocco at virtually 100% in 2004 Special 301.” Fortunately, “next December, a law on intellectual property protection will enter into force in Morocco to adapt national law to international norms Morocco, Economics.” Moreover, it is true that it is in every human being’s nature to lean towards what suits him or her most. In other words, as long as people are given the opportunity to purchase software or music at lower price, they will continue buying counterfeited products. In fact, very few people are aware of the impact of piracy on our country’s economy, and some tend to only think about their own financial efficiency. Therefore, if buying a pirated product can make them economize money, we still are far away from solving the problem. That is the reason why one shouldn’t throw the whole responsibility on the general consumer. Indeed, Moroccans are very...
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