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Youth Is Wasted on the Young

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Youth Is Wasted on the Young

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  • March 2012
  • 297 Words
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Youth is wasted on the young

My dad often keeps repeating, “If the young knew [how life works], if the old could do [something in the world, given their experience on how life works]”. This clearly states how commonly youth is defined: a transitory period of human beings’ life. This is half of the truth. Considering youth as an unrepeatable stage between childhood and adulthood is equivalent to say that there is a golden part of our life followed by a much longer one characterized by the daily carrying out of responsibilities and duties. On average, youth is distinguished by beauty, physical force, passions, dreams, free time and the will to discover the world. When someone is an adult, it seems like all these characteristics vanish. Where did they go? Frequently, people just forget them due to the not longer exciting ordinary life. Youth is something more: it is a state of mind, a way to tackle everyday situations which is independent from the age. In this sense, the young are those who, moved by passion, dreams or beliefs, are able to try to achieve something great and produce a positive externality on the community they belong to. The young have an optimistic approach and bear the negative consequences and situations smiling, knowing that the darkest moment of the night is precedent to the sunrise. Surely, the young (in age) too often waste their youth in cheap activities. But also the contrary holds: adults often waste opportunities considering being young (in age terms) as a necessary requirement to succeed. Both parties fail to recognize how powerful youth is and how it embraces the entire individual life and mind. In this sense, youth is never wasted on the young: it is just occasionally recognized properly and exploited.