Your Inner Fish

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 459
  • Published : February 22, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Discoveries in Biology- Your Inner Fish
Your Inner Fish
The book Your Inner Fish by Neil Shubin is an interesting novel that shows the evolution of some of our major structures through time. We all know about evolution and the monkeys but we never really looked in on evolution through “our inner fish”. The book was appealing because it helps to understand how we have come to be with some of the parts of our bodies we take for granted, like how we got our developed smell or our advanced color vision. Your Inner Fish is a good way to jump into the evolution of our ancestors and become more knowledgeable about where we came from.

This book helped deepen my understanding of human biology in a handful of ways. I have never really learned about the evolution of fish and the relationship between humans. All of my classes have been more focused on the evolution of hominids, like the one I was recently in. When thinking about evolution, I automatically go to hominids but this book has taught me to look at both. The book also helped me understand the importance of how the human species has evolved thru time and where the roots of major developments originate. Things like the way the body is built and the similar cells that are responsible for production have changed so much over time, it put into perspective how much change there has been. Deepening my understanding in another way would be the actuality of how similar we all are; fish, humans, amphibians. All creatures have similar structures, and that is why it is so crazy that we are all so different at the same time.

The three most important points of the book would be the body development, how similar genetics are, and why we have developed the way we have. All of these things Shubin goes into vast detail and explains the most important. Shubin linked a major part of the book relating to how the body develops compared to other organisms and the similarities between them all. In the book, you can’t help but...
tracking img