Ww2 and the Soviet Economy

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War never seems to be presented as a good thing. At best, it is marketed by those wishing to engage in it as a necessary evil. War destroys. It destroys villages, cities, buildings, communities, and most importantly it destroys human life and families and on a larger scale can destroy nations. War does not build. It is not constructive. War is destructive. The Russian people had enough war. They were weary of an unpopular war just decades earlier, and the result of the people’s resolve led to an absolution of the Tsarist government.

With profound changes to their government and their way of life, and a relatively stable economy, the Soviet people were beginning to believe in their government once again. Their agriculture was starting to grow, the investments in railroad were paying off as transportation to the interior was greatly advanced, and most importantly, the collectivization of the work force was driving industry to new levels. It is this new economic organization of a resolute people focussed on a common goal that was instrumental in the defeat of the Germans and thus the Allied victory of World War II.

It can be impossible to gauge how a population will respond to war. “There was a sharp contrast between the degree of wartime national unity and popular support upon which the two regimes, tsarist and Soviet, could draw. During World War I, the initial enthusiasm of the educated elite for war against Germans rapidly turned to despair and anger...By contrast, the Soviet regime encountered little overt popular dissatisfaction with the war effort.”1 The trust between the government and the governed was being restored, and the people were willing to trust Stalin to victory, in a way that they could not trust the leadership during World War I.

Comrade Semyanov, the director of the Kirov Works recalls the resolve of the people to Alexander Werth, “...though [the German bombing] frightened people, it also aroused their frantic anger against...
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