Ww1 Diary

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Majors Diary Section 3… Major JJ Durant… Log55… NAME: JJ DURANT
AGE: 21


Picture taken in 1914, May

Major Durant, Sign In…DAY 1.
I’ve just returned from a long refreshing rest and I’m ready to engage in battle. Eight days of rest just passed by as if they were eight hours. The usual, nothing new ever happens in the trenches. You see tones of rocks scattered around here and there, rats scurrying around, and lice almost everywhere you look and huge mud patches covering most of the trench itself. Not to mention my fellow soldiers falling asleep at night and finding them dead early in the morning. They would either die of earlier enemy attacks which would slowly inflict them causing a lot of pain and sooner or later kill them or of diseases given to them due to such bad trench conditions. Thank God that I have survived three years without anything bad happening to me. Actually as a matter of fact, I’m always in a relief every time I get away from that foul smelling dug-out hole, if you ask me it’s a sorry excuse for a trench we British have made. I feel excited and pumped up ready to go into battle, assisting my team mates and fighting against the opposition! As a Major I feel it is my job to support and lead my crew to victory! I command the attacks and defensive strategies we use against the opposition out here in the Battle Front of France. Although losing one of my men, I feel like its fault and I’m the one to blame. Warfare is a deadly thing; in one day only we lost around 70 to 80 soldiers due to a gas bombardment…it wasn’t a pretty sight to see. People accuse me of being too young for the Major position, but I’m a confident person and I would do anything to help my friends fight the opposition, whether they doubt me or not. When I was just a grunt of a soldier and the trenches were being made I wasn’t allowed to help neither were the other rookie soldiers. The trench was made really small especially for people above the height of 6ft. But we as a big alliance of soldiers have Day-To-Day Tasks. Soldiers did not spend all their time charging enemy trenches. Most of the infantry’s work was more like routine. Infantry soldiers spent much of their time digging new trenches or repairing old ones. Lots of hard work is involved in this process, including planting mines under the enemy trenches which is almost suicidal. But all and all I would summarize this by saying I would rather prefer hard fought battle for my country rather than sitting back in a rotten trench! Sign Off…

The Structure of Sniping Out Enemies.

Major Durant, Sign in…DAY2/DAY3
The shelling starts in preparation for attack! All soldiers were aware that their Day-To-Day lives could change in the blink of an eye. Sometimes the soldiers’ trenches could be area under discussion to non-stop artillery barrages for days on end. The majority of war causalities were caused by artilleries. When I was training for this aspect of war my commander told me to be alert and aware of my surrounding because death and injury could occur almost without warning, as shell buried soldiers lie under tons of earth, leaving smashed up bodies and ruined trenches, and the duty of burying the dead ones. Well I leave that to that, but even more dangerous were the ‘BIG GUNS’ of the artillery. We fired metal shells from several kilometers behind the front. The shells split open into jagged, razor-sharp pieces when they exploded. Therefore it was dangerous for soldiers even to put their heads above the trench, let alone attack the enemy. Both we and the enemy spent most of our time in trenches, guarding our positions. I think that things went quite well, major factor that supported this is: that the privates picked up the pace and made a great contribution to the shelling. Recruit Tom Buckle-Smith was outstanding although he injured his left knee cap badly; he still stayed strong and...
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