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Wundt

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  • December 2005
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1."The work I here present to the public is an attempt to mark out a new domain of science" -Wilhelm Wundt Wilhelm Wundt set out deliberately to found a new science. Wundt ardently promoted systematic experimentation. It was while he was studying physiology that he began to depict the study of psychology as an independent experimental scientific discipline. He first outlined his ideas in a book named Contributions to the Theory of Sensory Perception. In this book he described experiments he was conducting in a makeshift laboratory made in his home. It was in this book when he first coined the term "experimental psychology". This is considered the literary birth of a new science. Wundt chose the title for his new science to be physiological psychology. At this time in history in German physiologically and experimental were used in the same context. This is because of how much he stressed the importance of systematic experimentation. From his makeshift laboratory to Lepzig, Wundt was always conducting experiments. Wundt's discovery of just noticeable difference and two-point threshold are major contributions. This is why Wilhelm Wundt named his new science experimental physiological psychology. This "new" psychology created by Weber is actually a melting pot of ideas put together to form a new science. There are a couple main ideas that seem to be the most important antecedents to "new" psychology. The first contributor would be philosophy. Empiricist philosophers were concerned with how the mind attains knowledge. Empiricist view is that the mind grows through the compilation of sensory experiences. Locke and Berkeley contributed to our thoughts on perception and senses. James Mill applied the doctrine of mechanism to the human mind. Mill suggested that the mind should be studied by the method of analysis, by reducing the mind to elementary components. John Stuart Mill believed the mind...