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Write from Memory

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  • June 22, 2013
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Writing from Memory

The writer and narrator Marcel Proust is a very interesting fellow. The Overture or also called “Swan Way” describes Marcel early childhood and also opens up to him stating “For a long time I use to go to bed early.” Marcel Proust describes how difficult it was just for him to fall asleep. He then falls asleep, he then states he was reading a book prior however when he finally fell asleep imagining he is part of the book he was reading or well subject to it, but he awakes to find out that he was asleep. (Proust, 1909)

The Overture is more of an autobiographical than anything else. The Overture sets the tone for the rest of his novels and the major theme is the relationship between time and memory. There is one part in the story where Marcel is drinking tea and eating sponge cake. This instantly causes a relaxation in Marcel and eventually reminds him of his past memories where he would have a similar meal back in “Combrary”. This is another example in involuntary memory as he was not trying to remember the past it just came naturally by the cue of drinking tea and eating a sponge cake. (Proust, 1909)

The biggest difference from Marcel Proust's “Overture” and an more realistic novel is that it isn't organized in genuine sense or rather when Proust wrote the Overture he would talk about the future, past, and present which were laid out in memory. The main characters of the story were all introduced in the beginning. The narrative also changes from first person to third person which was unusual in writing realistic novel as the perspective generally stays the same throughout the story. The way Marcel Proust wrote his long paragraphs to sentences so he could fully tell his metaphors. When reading the Overture I can't help, but be instilled as if I was there with Marcel during that time of his telling it.

References

Proust, M. (2003). In search of lost time: Proust 6-pack (proust complete) [paperback]. Modern Library.

Proust,...