Would You Sign Charles 1 Death Warrant

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Charles I of England, Law, Charles II of England
  • Pages : 2 (705 words )
  • Download(s) : 271
  • Published : May 27, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
ou sign charWould you sign Charles I death warrant?

Charles I did not cooperate or want to work with parliament. He believed very strongly in divine right and abided by it throughout his reign. This is what started the civil war. This however does not mean that Charles should have been sentenced to death. Firstly there was no law in English History that dealt with the trial of a monarch and the order was based on an ancient roman law. The public were not allowed into the court until the charge was read out. This leaves a lingering question as to why they would do this if the y felt that their case against Charles was just. Charles was not given a fair guilty verdict. There were only 135 judges in the jury some were Parliament, army officers and land owners. Out of the 135 judges only 80 showed up so he automatically had 55 judges pleading not guilty. 68 of the 80 judges said that Charles was guilty. So far in total there were 67 people who found him not guilty. Only 59 judges actually signed the death warrant. The odds were for Charles not being sent to death. The death warrant was not justified because the evidence did not support a guilty verdict. Charles refused to himself against the charges put forward by Parliament. Finally on 27th January 1649 when Charles refused to defend himself he was sentenced to death at the High Court of Justice meeting in Westminster Hall. The first charge of the case was “That he did ignore the will of Parliament and ruled according to his own will.” In this particular charge Charles was guilty as he did not consult parliament over important decisions and he only took advice from a small group of people whom he liked. He raised taxes without parliaments consent. Charles did not believe he was doing anything wrong because he believed in divine right which meant God had chosen him to be his representative and only God could judge any unjust behaviour; no law of court had a right to pass judgement over him. Anyone who went...
tracking img