World Trade Patterns

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Between 1000-1700 world trade patterns changed due to the discovery of the Western Hemisphere, and the decline of the importance of land routes. However, one world trade aspect that stayed the same was the importance of the Indian Ocean Basin and the spices that were found there.

One thing that significantly changed world trade was the addition of the Western Hemisphere. Nations in Europe created colonies in the Western Hemisphere to acquire natural resources like lumber, silver, and gold. Also, the addition of the Western Hemisphere created the first Global Economic System. This connected Europe, Africa, and the New World together in triangular trade. Nations could now trade more easily and effectively. Lastly, the addition of the Western Hemisphere exported European religion. While England sent people who wanted to be free from the Church of England, Spain wanted to convert the indigenous people to their religion, Catholicism.

Another change in world trade was the decline of importance in the previously crucial land routes. The Silk Roads in China were becoming obsolete. At this point China was only involved in trade to acquire silver. The Manila Route, a sea route, was able to take silver from the abundance in South America directly to China. Therefore, it was more efficient to go by sea than by land. Similarly, the Trans-Saharan route was losing significance because there was now a direct, cheap, efficient route by sea.

One aspect of world trade that remained the same during 1000-1700 was the importance of Indian Ocean Basin. This is because the spices that were found there were still highly valued. They were a luxury good and in demand around the world.

While there are a few similarities between the Post-Classical time period and the Early Modern period, many significant changes were made. These changes helped world trade emerge and flourish.
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