World Drug Report 2012

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2012

WORLD
DRUG
REPORT

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE ON DRUGS AND CRIME
Vienna

World Drug Report
2012

UNITED NATIONS
New York, 2012

© United Nations, June 2012. All rights reserved worldwide. ISBN: 978-92-1-148267-6
e-ISBN: 978-92-1-055653-8
United Nations publication, Sales No. E.12.XI.1
This publication may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgement of the source is made. UNODC would appreciate receiving a copy of any publication that uses this publication as a source.

Suggested citation: UNODC, World Drug Report 2012 (United Nations publication, Sales No. E.12.XI.1).
No use of this publication may be made for resale or any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior permission in writing from
the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime. Applications for such permission, with a statement of purpose and intent of the reproduction, should be addressed to UNODC, Research and Trend Analysis Branch. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of UNODC or contributory organizations, nor does it imply any endorsement. Comments on the report are welcome and can be sent to:

Research and Trend Analysis Branch
United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime
PO Box 500
1400 Vienna
Austria
Tel: (+43) 1 26060 0
Fax: (+43) 1 26060 5827
E-mail: wdr@unodc.org
Website: www.unodc.org
UNODC gratefully acknowledges the contribution of the Government of Austria towards the cost of the World Drug Report 2012.

iii

PREFACE

Global opium production amounted to 7,000 tons in
2011. That is more than a fifth less than the peak of 2007
but an increase from the low level of 2010, the year in
which a plant disease destroyed almost half of the opium
harvest in Afghanistan, which continues to be the world’s
biggest producer. The total area under coca bush cultivation in the world fell by 18 per cent between 2007 and 2010 and by 33 per cent since 2000. Efforts to reduce
cultivation and production of the main plant-based problem drugs have, however, been offset by rising levels of synthetic drug production, including significant increases
in the production and consumption of psychoactive substances that are not under international control. Although Member States are to be commended for their
hard work in dealing with the drug problem, often with
the support of UNODC, the figures sketched above indicate the scale of the challenge. The response by UNODC has been twofold: first, develop an integrated approach;
and second, focus on prevention, treatment, alternative
development and the promotion of fundamental human
rights.
Developing an integrated approach

Drug trafficking flows have global dimensions. The flows
link regions and continents, sometimes with dramatic consequences for the countries they affect. Our research and trend analysis is designed to improve understanding of
those issues. The results are fed into integrated programmes to reduce illicit drug supply and demand.
UNODC is building integrated regional programmes, as
well as promoting interregional and inter-agency responses.
One such inter-agency approach is the United Nations
system Task Force on Transnational Organized Crime and
Drug Trafficking, established in 2011.
In December 2011, the UNODC Regional Programme
for Afghanistan and Neighbouring Countries was launched.
To support this programme, UNODC and its partners
have created cross-border, intelligence and precursor control initiatives to share information and experience and to

conduct joint operations. All these regional initiatives are interlinked with existing law enforcement networks.
There are also new initiatives for countering moneylaundering and for coupling law enforcement with alternative livelihoods. An initiative has been launched to
disrupt drug trafficking by sea in West and South Asia.
UNODC...
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