World's Fair Importance

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  • Topic: Expo, Paris, Expo 2010
  • Pages : 3 (761 words )
  • Download(s) : 87
  • Published : October 11, 2010
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Our world today is filled with different cultures and societies. People have different arts, beliefs, languages, foods, traditions, and more. An individual's attitudes, values, ideals, and beliefs are greatly influenced by the culture or cultures in which he or she lives. I believe that it is important to recognize these different cultures to learn from each other, adapt new technologies, new agricultural techniques, and grow into stronger more complex societies. The Exposition Universelle Internationale, also known as the World's Fair, accomplished this. The World's Fair is a large public exhibitions held in different parts of the world. In 1900, it was held in Paris, France and was considered as one of the most successful. This paper will discuss the importance of the fair and what it brings in our world today.

The Paris exposition of 1900 was held to celebrate the achievements of the past century and to accelerate development into the next. It opened in April 15 by President Loubet until November 12, 1900. According to The History of World Expositions (2000), more than 50 million people attended the exhibition and 43 countries participated. The fair included more than 76,000 exhibitors and covered 1.12 square kilometers of Paris (“Expo2000,” 2000). The article also states that Paris' most noted architectures were displayed such as the Palace of Electricity, the Eiffel Tower, the Porte Binet (main gate with 36 entrances), Trocadero and the Machine Hall. However, visitors were amazed not so much by the architectural innovations but by the theatrical means of creating illusions such as spectacular lights and water. The fair also displayed different cultures such as Africans and Asians. According to the authors of our text, “Africans pounded nuts and Asians danced, carved, and performed... mud huts, mosques, and temples were illuminated by electric lights” (Crossley, Lees, & Sevos, 2008). It lost, however, its authenticallity and emphasized that Europeans were...
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