Workplace Relationships

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents2
Introduction:3
Peer Co-workers/ Supervisors’ Relationships3
Workplace Relationship Quality:4
Peer Relationships4
Study Description and Results5
Interpersonal Conflict6
Identifying Conflicts and Causes6
Dealing with Interpersonal Conflict7
Culture and Interpersonal Conflict7
Intimate Workplace Relationships8
Managing Workplace Relationships9
Managing Conflict9
Management by Deception: Deceptive Impression Management10 References:12
Introduction:

When considering workplace relationships, consider the interpersonal interaction between individuals within the organization. The influential sharing, the decision making, experience sharing and support systems. In Chapter 4 of our text, Jone L. Pearce talks about employee moods and feelings and how the relate to the success or failure of an organization. Employee feelings and moods can have a direct impact on the types of relationships they build with co-workers or supervisors. Workplace relationships were also referenced in Chapter 7 of our text, which talks about how feelings and attitudes within the organization are contagious. Job Performance and even competition is something that is affected heavily by relation to others as well. It might be safe to say that the stronger the relationship between individuals within the organization the more likely they will share the same views and attitudes towards the company as well as their supervisor. To take a deeper look into workplace relationships several studies were examined to show the overall aspect and importance of how employees relate.

Peer Co-workers/ Supervisors’ Relationships

The first study to mention was completed by Patricia M. Sias. She focused on how the relationship between peer co-workers and their supervisors depends heavily on the quality of communication between the individuals. The good or bad relationship ultimately affects employee satisfaction and commitment to the organization. In Patricia’s study she analyses the association between workplace relationship quality and the transfer of quality information given to employees. Though all employees value information highly, this study focused primarily on new employees which are in fact solely dependent on the information given to them when they begin with a new company. The better the relationship is between a supervisor and their subordinate the more trust worthy they feel of each other. Their goals become more common and the team interest is geared towards the main objectives instead of personal gains. The better the relationship also equals less chances of turnover within the company. Workplace Relationship Quality:

According to Sias, higher quality relationships between supervisors and subordinates contribute to more of a closeness where they will both share openness and honesty. The higher quality relationship can also dictate the quality of information the supervisor then gives the employee. The supervisor may be willing to also share sensitive information with their closer subordinates. Sias categorizes the close employees as “in-group” and the distant or low quality relationship employees as the “out-group”. Based on Sias’ findings about the manager subordinate relationships, she came up with 2 hypotheses: (1) Supervisor-subordinate relationship quality is positively associated with the amount of information employees receive from their supervisor and (2) Supervisor subordinate relationship quality is positively associated with the quality of information employees receive from their supervisor.

Peer Relationships

Peer relationships are just as important as the supervisor subordinate relationships. The peers are where the individuals get their support system on a more personal level. Most likely the peers will understand each other better having to do the same type of work and at times having to report to the same supervisor. Peers are...
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