Working Capital

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 284
  • Published : September 21, 2011
Open Document
Text Preview
tutor2u™

Working Capital 
Introduction to the  Management of  Working Capital 

AS & A2 Business Studies 
PowerPoint Presentations 2005 

Introduction 
•  All businesses need cash to survive  •  Cash is needed to:  –  Invest in fixed assets  –  Pay suppliers and employees  –  Fund overheads and other fixed costs  –  Pay tax due to the Government 

•  Nearly all businesses use much of their cash resources  to finance investment in “working capital”  •  Managing working capital effectively is, therefore, a  vital part of making sure the business has enough cash  to continue

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

What is Working Capital? 
What is Working Capital? 

Working capital is the cash needed to  pay for the day­to­day operation of the  business  How is It Calculated?

Working capital is the difference  between the current assets of a  business and its current liabilities  tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Definition of Working Capital 

Current  Assets 
Less 

Assets of the business  held in cash form (e.g.  at the bank) or that that  can quickly be turned  into cash 

Current  Liabilities 

Money owed by a  business which will  need to be paid in the  next 12 months

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Definition of Working Capital 
Stocks 

Current  Assets 
Less 

Debtors  Cash  Investments 

Trade Creditors 

Current  Liabilities 

Taxation  Dividends  Short­term Loans

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Calculating Working Capital ­ Example 
Stocks  Trade Debtors  Current  Assets  Cash  Prepayments  Less  £250,000  £500,000  £900,000  £125,000  £25,000  £250,000 

Working Capital =
Trade Creditors  £350,000  £100,000 

Current  Liabilities 

Taxation  Dividends  Short­term Loans 

£650,000  £50,000  £150,000 

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

The Working Capital Cycle 
•  Not all businesses have the same need to invest in  working capital  •  Much depends on  (1) The nature of the production process (i.e. what and how something  is being produced), and  (2) The way in which the product is distributed to customers 

•  The working capital cycle is: 
–  The period of time between the point at which cash is first spent on  the production of a product and the final collection of cash from a  customer

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Working Capital Cycle ­ Illustrated 
Raw Materials ordered from  suppliers and put into stock  awaiting production.  Cash  is used up to finance stocks  (by paying the suppliers) 

Finally the product starts to  generate cash – as  customers pay the amounts  they owe. Then the whole  process starts again

More cash is used to finance  the production process –  employ staff, run the factory  and other support operations 

More cash is used up to store  finished products and distribute  them to the intended markets.  Trade customers are allowed to  buy now and pay later – so  debtors increase” 

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Working Capital Ratios (liquidity) 
•  The “liquidity position” of a business refers to its ability  to pay its debts – i.e. does it have enough cash to pay  the bills?  •  The balance sheet of a business provides a “snapshot”  of the working capital position at a particular point in  time  •  There are two key ratios that can be calculated to  provide a guide to the liquidity position of a business  –  Current ratio  –  Acid test (“quick”) ratio

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Current Ratio 
Calculation  Formula  Example Calculation
£’000  Stocks  Trade debtors  Cash balances  Current Assets  Trade Creditors  Other short­term liabilities  Current Liabilities  1,125  1,750  650  3,525  1,025  235  1,260 

Current Assets  Current Liabilities 

3,525 

=
1,260 

2.8 

tutor2u™ 

www.tutor2u.net 

Acid Test (“Quick”) Ratio 
Calculation  Formula  Example Calculation
£’000  Stocks  Trade debtors  Cash balances  Current Assets  Trade Creditors  Other short­term liabilities ...
tracking img