Womens Rights

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Amanda Aubuchon
Mrs. Alicia Lopez
English 302B
December 14, 2012
“Women’s Rights Throughout The Ages"
The Feminist Movement of America has been around now for over a century. The Movement has helped women all over the United States gain freedom and the rights of a man. The Women’s Liberation Movement was very important because it has altered this country in many ways, including, the formation of NAWSA, Susan B. Anthony fighting for her rights, and Roe V. Wade was enacted.

Two women, named Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Lucretia Mott, were actually the first women to begin what is known as today as the Women’s Rights Movements. Most people think Susan B. Anthony started the movement, but this is indeed a myth. Elizabeth Cady Stanton was born on November 12th, in Jamestown, New York (Johnson Lewis, “Elizabeth Cady Stanton”). Stanton helped write The Declaration of Sentiments along with Lucretia Mott in the year 1848. Lucretia Mott, who served as a minister in 1818 (Johnson Lewis, “Lucretia Mott”), not only helped write The Declaration of Sentiments but also helped organize many women’s abolitionist societies in the 1840’s. In 1848, both Stanton and Mott held a convention centered on women’s rights, located in Seneca Falls, New York. While at the convention, The Declaration of Sentiments was signed by 68 women and 32 men. As quoted in The Declaration of Sentiments, there is a line that reads, “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal”. Thanks to this Declaration, women were given the same equal rights as men.

In the year 1890, a group named t he National American Woman Suffrage Association, also abbreviated to NAWSA was formed (Imbornoni, “Women’s Rights”). NAWSA was formed so women could go state to state to spread the word about the legalization of voting in the United States. Joining Cady Stanton was Susan B. Anthony, who was a co-president in the foundation. NAWSA figured if they pushed for suffrage in enough...
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