Women Ordination

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 111
  • Published : May 8, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Table of Contents
Introduction3
The Historical Development of Ordination Practice into Christianity6
Analysis of the Theology of the Ordination Practice Scripturally11
Sources of Theological practice and church edification11
The Context of the theological information about ordination15
The Problem with Traditional Ordination19
What the Greek NT text says regarding how the saints chose their elders.35
Other Greek words38
Why were the elders elected through a vote?39
What about the concept of ‘ranks’?40
Did the saints lay their hands on the elders they chose?41
Regarding the words and concepts ‘clergy’ and ‘ministry’42
Conclusion44
Appendix47
Appendix: Mithraism Notes47
Appendix: Analysis of What is Happening with the Ordination of Women Pastors49
Appendix: Ministerial Authority54
Appendix: Ordination to the Gospel Ministry56
Appendix: comparison of the text of BIS-1602 and KJV-1611.59
Appendix: Fifteen general rules were advanced for the guidance of the translators61
Appendix: Translators63
Appendix: The King James Version is rigged with Doctrinal Bias65

Introduction

The issue of ordination has remained a bone of contention in the Seventh-day Adventist church since its formation. It has not been adequately addressed and has been practised traditionally for years to elevate pastors above the rest of the laity with women inclusive. Various positions have been posited to support the status quo while bashing and labelling the Women Ministry who challenges the status quo and are purporting the opposite view that women should also be ordained as pastors and elders.

The traditional hardliners accuse the women ministry of upholding foreign views such as feminism and liberalism. In fact Koranteng-Pipim seems to be focused on challenging the ordaining of “women as elders or pastors that it is not scriptural based and regards it as new light that the worldwide Seventh-day Adventist church is being urged to embrace.” He argues vehemently that ordination is reserved to men and not to women. He cited in his arguments verses that have nothing to do with ordination to mean that they categorically and logically exclude women from being ordained. At the same breath he uses also verse that have nothing to do with ordination, which traditionalists including the Seventh-day Adventists have applied to refer to ordination without much study or question.

The arguments by Koranteng-Pipim are detailed in his article ‘Does the Bible support Women as elders or pastors’ parts 1 – 3. It should be emphasized that Koranteng-Pipim represents a school of thought that maintain the tradition of the first leaders in the Seventh-Day Adventist church that was opposed to Ellen White’s position that maintained that women should actually be ordained as elders and pastors.

The position of the traditionalists to challenge this new light is based on the premise that the church has not found any precedent from both the Bible, the writings of Ellen G. White or the early Seventh-day Adventist Church on the practice of ordaining women for more than the century of existence of the church.

According to Koranteng-Pipim this new trend or new light became established in the 1970s because of the converging interests of feminism; liberalism; church leader’s desire to enjoy United States tax law benefits to ministers; questionable church policy revisions and the Church Manual alterations allowing women to serve as elders; calculated attempts by some influential North American churches unilaterally to ordain women as pastors; the silence of leadership to this defiance of two General Conference (GC) session votes against women's ordination; a well-orchestrated strategy by influential thought leaders and pro-ordination groups to domesticate the practice in the church; a determined effort by some church scholars to reinterpret the Bible and early Adventist history to justify the practice; the...
tracking img