Women Employment in India

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GENDER DISCRIMINATION
(Women employment in China and India)
Sunida Singh
Expo36@gmail.com
082
WE FORGET TO TAKE A PHOTO TOGETHER ^ ^

TABLE OF CONTENT

Introduction3
Gender discrimination4
Global Women Employment6
Women Employment in China……………………………………………….…11 Women Employment in India14
* Labor force trends & legislation………………………………...…………15 * Management………………………………………………………………..16 * Changing Work Place………………………………...……………………17 Successful case to promote women employment

AVON China, the company for women……………………………………….18 TATA India
* About Tata Steel & Corporate Sustainability Services18 * Empowerment initiatives of Tata Steel help women to achieve feat19 * TATA Motors Grihini Udyog…………………………...…………………20 Conclusion & Recommendation26

References27

Introduction
This issue of the Gender Discrimination (Women employment in China and India) looks at the gender aspects of this impact, and updates indicators on the situation of women in labor markets. This report reconfirms that gender inequality remains an issue within labor markets globally. Women suffer multiple disadvantages in terms of access to labor markets, and often do not have the same level of freedom as men to choose to work. Gender differences in labor force participation rates and unemployment rates are a persistent feature of global labor markets. In 2008, an estimated 6.3 per cent of the world’s female labor force was not working but looking for work, up from 6.0 per cent in 2007, while the corresponding rate for males was 5.9 per cent in 2008, up from 5.5 per cent in 2007. Gender wage differentials may be due to a variety of factors, including crowding of women in low paying industries and differences in skills and work experience, but may also be the result of discrimination. Given the constraints women are facing, promoting gender equality and empowering women is not only an important goal of the Millennium Declaration in itself, it is also pivotal to achieving the new target on full and productive employment and decent work for all, and virtually all remaining goals and targets. This issue of Gender Discrimination (women employment in China and India) starts with an analysis of global women employment based on currently available information. Section two looks at the women employment in China and its impact. Followed sections are about women employment in India and its impact. Successful case to promote women employees. A final section concludes and highlights a number of policies to prevent gender discrimination.

Gender discrimination
Though gender discrimination and sexism refers to beliefs and attitudes in relation to the gender of a person, such beliefs and attitudes are of a social nature and do not, normally, carry any legal consequences. Sex discrimination, on the other hand, may have legal consequences. Though what constitutes sex discrimination varies between countries, the essence is that it is an adverse action taken by one person against another person that would not have occurred had the person been of another sex. Discrimination of that nature in certain enumerated circumstances is illegal in many countries. Currently, discrimination based on sex is defined as adverse action against another person, which would not have occurred had the person been of another sex. This is considered a form of prejudice and is illegal in certain enumerated circumstances in most countries. Sexual discrimination can arise in different contexts. For instance an employee may be discriminated against by being asked discriminatory questions during a job interview, or because an employer did not hire, promote or wrongfully terminated an employee based on their gender, or employers pay unequally based on gender. In an educational setting there could be claims that a student was excluded from an educational institution, program, opportunity, loan, student group, or scholarship due to their gender. In the...
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