Women Confronting War

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SUBMITTED TO: AMENA MOHSIN
COURSE TEACHER: GENDER & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
COURSE NO: WGS # 202
DEPARTMENT OF WOMEN AND GENDER STUDIES
UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA

SUBMITTED BY: SHABNAM FERDOUSY
CLASS: 2ND YEAR, 3RD SEMESTER
SESSION: 2008-09
ROLL NO: 201
COURSE NAME: GENDER & INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
COURSE NO: WGS # 202
UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA

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Women confronting war

Content:

1. Introduction

2. The impact of war on women:
• Women as direct casualties
• Women as war refugees
• Wartime sexual violence against women:
➢ Rape
➢ Prostitution
• Wartime domestic violence
• Loss of family
• Loss of work, community & social structure

3. Women’s response to war:
• Joining
• Soldiers
• Military production worker
• Sending, supporting & reporting men
• Resisting

4. Gendered social relations as a cause of war

5. Conclusion

1. Introduction:

War has profound and unique effects on women. Rather than being separate from women’s lives, war making relies on women’s participation. However, conventional views of the relationship between gender and war suggest that men make war, women make peace. Men, representing their nations or social groups, combat men of another group, while women remain outside the fighting, protected by “their” men. Women do remain invisible in military policy making; reflecting taken-for-scholarship and empirical reality challenge the prevailing assumptions bout war’s relationship to men and women. It is important to examine the many faces of women confronting war: the distinct impact the war has no women due to their gender and the various wyes that women respond. We should consider the major debates within this field of study and explore gender inequality as a cause of war.

2. The impact of war on women:

Women suffer from war in many ways, including dying, experiencing sexual abuse end torture, and losing loved ones, and communities. Many people assume that women are unlikely to die in wars, since so few women serve in the armed forces worldwide. But women, as civilians re more likely to be killed in war than re soldiers.

• Women as direct casualties:

War’s impact on women has changed the development of increasingly efficient war-making technologies that make war and militarism more and more deadly. Women and their children constitute the vast majority of these civilian casualties. Besides analyzing war through the lens of gender, we must also explore the global intersections between gender and class, race, nation and ethnicity. Women may be more or less vulnerable to the effects of war and militarization depending on their home society, their economic status and their racial/ethnic identity. Women in developing countries re most likely to experience war, and most likely to be driven from their homelands.

• Women as war refugees:

Women are also most likely to be uprooted by war. More than four-fifths of war refugees re women and young girls, who also experience additional and often sexualized violence during their flight. Refugee women often serve es their children’s sole caretakers, as many of them are widows or separated from their spouses and other extended family. Refugee women in exile are often the supporters of n extended family network, plying a central economic role yet still lacking decision-making power in their societies.

• Wartime sexual violence against women:

The United Nation High Commissioner on refugees (UNHCR) cites sexual attacks on women and girls by camp guards as major problem. Even those women and girls stationed in camp and refugee settlement, as well as in new societies of residence, frequently suffer sexual abuse, abduction, and forced...
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