Women at Work in Ireland

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Women at Work

Today women are as active as they have ever been in our workforce, but they have been known as the caregivers in the Irish society.

Women traditionally have been expected to stay at home to take care of the children and depend on men to bring home the income. Girls learned from their mother s examples in cooking, cleaning, and childcare and had a limited education. In recent decades the trend has changed; however, women still continue to face barriers to many occupations. These roles were altered when the changes in women s rights began.

Women and men traditionally have worked in different specific occupations within the professional occupational category. For example, women were less likely than men to be employed in some of the highest-paying occupations, such as doctors, solicitors, engineers. Instead, women were more likely to get secondary jobs, which pay less, lack lack the opportunity for further training or even a promotion and do not offer job security to the employees. The segmentation is all about low paying jobs for women workers since the sectors they work in are mostly overcrowded or saturated. Men were always the main suppliers of food and money, and women were always the ones who had a duty to look after the children and housekeeping, which means that females were dependent on men financially.

Discussion

"...The first class opposition that occurs in history coincides with the development of antagonism between man and woman in monogamous marriage, and the first class oppression coincides with that of the female sex by the male." (F. Engels: The Origin of the Family)

Irish history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries was dominated by the issues of nationalism and land, with men at the centre of it. Referring to the internet website, several attempts were made to restrict women’s access to work. The Cumann na nGaedheal government sought to prohibit women from entering the higher grades of the Civil...
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