Wk 1 Dq 2

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 39
  • Published : January 19, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Explain how drugs are administered to pediatric patients and how these methods would differ in an adult patient. According to Lippincott’s Nursing Center, the age related differences in drug disposition, metabolism, excretion, and pharmacodynamics effects, coupled with the special pharmacologic considerations of the ill child, could make the pediatric patient a pharmacotherapeutic challenge. Health care professionals must understand the differences between the pediatric patient and the adult patient. For example, a health care professional should not administer a dose of Advil to a child that is specified for an adult because it would be too potent for the child’s body to handle leading in an overdose. Anyone who has bought over-the-counter medications knows that there are age categories and weight categories on the label or box of the medication. When it comes to the pediatric patient there are usually several different categories that come with their own individual dosage instructions. Take Children’s Tylenol for example. The recommended age group is ages 2-11. The label on the back of the bottle breaks down the weight into 6 different categories. Each weight category comes with an age group that has a set dose. A pediatric patient who is between 72-95 pounds at 11 years of age would receive 15ml of the medication. However, a patient that is 24-35 pounds between the ages of 2-3 years would only receive a 5ml dose. Following the correct dosing for a pediatric patient can eliminate overdose or not giving the child enough of the medication in order to see results. When it comes to administering the drug to the pediatric patient there are several different ways to accomplish this. Depending on the drug it can be given orally, rectally, intramuscular, subcutaneous, intravenous, intraosseous, or intranasal. A patient who has poor palatability of oral medications or difficulty swallowing pills would want to go anther route getting the drug (Warrington, 2011)....
tracking img