Read full document

"Wisdom of Solomon"

  • By
  • August 27, 2007
  • 521 Words
  • 21 Views
Page 1 of 2
Wisdom of Solomon is a poetic discourse composed in Greek by a Hellenistic Jew in Alexandria, Egypt. The main function of this document appears to encourage fellow-Jews to take pride in the faith. The Wisdom of Solomon claims to address alien kings in order to teach them wisely but its real audience is more likely the Hellenistic Jewish community in Alexandria. Wisdom shows the entry into Judaism of the belief of the immortality of the soul. The author continually reminds his readers of their roots in monotheism, despite their polytheist surroundings. In addition, the community being addressed in the Solomon is the people who were experiencing persecution in some form, and they would receive immortality as a reward if they remained faithful and righteous. Righteousness is the "fulfillment of the demands of a relationship." In the Greek language the word basically means conformity to social custom, while in Hebrew it means conformity to the standard decreed by God.

Wisdom is defined as righteousness by Solomon, meaning to stay morally upright, and have faith in god. He says that wisdom is a kind spirit and it does not enter the soul who is full of guilt or sin. Wisdom is found by those who do not push god to test and shows himself to those who do not mistrust god. Immoral activity separate men from god and when these foolish people test the power of god, by saying against god, would invite trouble for themselves and will not go unnoticed because god is everywhere an he is listening to us when we do not want to believe him or say such things as "There is no God", those people do not stay unnoticed and are punished by god.

Among the characteristic of wisdom, the afterlife is described in terms of the Hellenistic dualism which debases matter in contrast to the immortality of the soul, rather than the Judaic concept of the resurrection of the body. In addition, the personification of wisdom is carried much farther than in any parallel Judaic literature. The...