Winter Olympics 2006 Marketing Plan

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Torino 2006: What Kind of Olympic Winter Games Were They?
A Preliminary Account From an Organizational and Economic Perspective Piervincenzo Bondonio and Nadia Campaniello 

Citius,Altius,Fortius!TowhatextentdoesthemottooftheOlympicsrelatetoTorino2006?HastheXXtheditionoftheOlympicWinterGames(OWG)continuedthe positivetrendwherebyeachedition,withonlyafewexceptions,surpassestheone before?Inwhichareashavetherebeenimprovements,ifany?Towhatextenthave thetargetssetbythebidpromotersandtheorganizersbeenachieved,ormissed? Finally,onwhatfoundationsandfromwhichperspectiveshaveTurinanditssurroundingOlympicvalleysmanagedtoplan,andhowaretheypreparingtomake themostoftheheritageoftheGames,whichisnowthemainreasonthatdrivesa city(andacountry)tobeartheexpensivechallengeoftheirorganization?Inthis essay,primarilyfromaneconomicpointofview,wewillattempttorespondtothese questions,intheknowledgethatmorecompleteanswerswillcomeatalaterstage.

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What Kind of Olympic Winter Games Were Those of Torino 2006?

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Organizational Aspects and Their Perceived Qualities

et us start with some general information (Table 1), which compares Torino 2006 to the seven previous editions of the OWG.1 As we can see, many statistics for Torino 2006 show an increase compared to previous editions: the number of events, the number of national Olympic teams, the number of athletes, and the number of media operators all increased compared to the previous Games, and more than doubled compared to Lake Placid in 1980.2 The increase in media coverage of the Turin Games was even greater; more than 200 countries were represented, guaranteeing coverage rivalling that of the more recent editions of the Summer Olympics. Indeed, it was more than four times greater than the coverage of the Games in Lake Placid 1980. Unchanged, however, are the duration (16 days – except for Salt Lake which staged its Games over 17 days) and the number of sports (still 7). PiervincenzoBondonioisProfessorofPublicEconomics,DepartmentofEconomicsandOMERO, University ofTorino, Italypiervincenzo.bondonio@unito.it. Nadia Campaniello is a Doctoral Candidate,InteruniversityCentrefortheComparativeAnalysisofLawandEconomics,Torino, Italynadia.campaniello@unito.it.

Olympika XV (2006), pp. 1-33

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Bondonio&Campaniello

In the Piedmont, however, in two cases the figures, compared to Salt Lake City, show a reduction (although moderate). This is the case for spectators (although the figure is not yet official) – approximately 1.5 million. There were 100,000 more at Salt Lake City 2002. It is also the case for volunteers (20,000, compared to 22,000 at Salt Lake City 2002, and 32,579 at Nagano 1998). In both cases, the reduction, while not an automatic indication of failure, may nevertheless show that something about the organization was less than optimal. For spectators at Torino’s various Olympic venues, attendance, especially by Italians, and for certain sports, was lower than forecast, due not only to the delay by the Italian media in announcing and publicizing Torino 2006 (we will return to this subject later), but also to certain errors in ticketing procedures. For example, tickets sold online, which were not available for a long time, appeared as available just before the event. And finally, the high cost of admission, which discouraged spectators with lower incomes, was somewhat counterbalanced by the last minute sale of tickets at highly discounted prices. Approximately 900,000 tickets were sold in all, or 90 % of those available. Table 1: The Last Eight OWG at a Glance

Lillehammer 1994 LakePlacid 1980 Albertville 1992 SaltLakeCity 2002 852,000 Utah U.S.A. 17 78 7 77 2,399 8,730 22,000 1,600 748

Sarajevo 1984

Nagano 1998

Calgary 1988

Population Region/ State Country Duration...
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