Wings of Desire( Who to Blame for Romeo and Juliet's Death)

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 16
  • Published : March 21, 2013
Open Document
Text Preview
Wings of Desire

Every person in this Earth yearns to love, to be loved, to know love, our true identity the reason for being alive is led by desire. In William Shakespeare’s play, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, desire and devotion has control over their fates and futures. Romeo Montague is the young son of the affluent Montague family, who falls in love with the only daughter of the Capulet family his family’s archenemy. Juliet Capulet is the beautiful and only daughter of the Capulet family who falls in love with Romeo Montague the son of her family’s rival. Lord Capulet head of the Capulet household and Juliet’s father, who is protective of his family and has drastic mood changes. Although Lord Capulet, Romeo and Juliet have the best intentions for the future of the families, they should be blamed for the deaths because of their stubborn desires.

Romeo desires to be dedicated to the people he loves and is willing to do anything for them before thinking of the consequences of his actions. Romeo’s loyalty to his friends provokes him to take matters in his own hands. Mercutio is one of Romeo’s close friends he is crazy, out of control and never backs down from a fight. He is a lover of sword-fighting and believes that love is purely a sexual affair. Mercutio like Romeo is devoted to his friends and is willing to fight for them. When Tybalt Capulet, Juliet’s cousin, challenges Romeo to a fight he refuses to duel Tybalt due to being newly married to Juliet. Mercutio steps in for him and accepts his challenge for Romeo. As soon as they begin fighting Mercutio is stabbed by Tybalt and is killed by him. Romeo seeing his friend lying on the ground dying, impulsively reacts believing that it is his duty to reciprocate Mercutio’s death through killing Tybalt, “Alive in triumph—and Mercutio slain! / Away to heaven, respective lenity, / And fire-eyed fury be my conduct now” (3.1. 126-129). Romeo’s inability to control his emotions leads him to act in a reckless...
tracking img