Wind and Strong Tornadoes

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A tornado is defined as a violently rotating column extending from a thunderstorm to the ground.The most violent tornadoes are capable of tremendous destruction with wind speeds of two hundred and fifty miles per hour or more.Damage paths can be more one mile wide and fifty miles long. In an average year,eight hundred tornadoes are reported nationwide,resulting in eighty deaths and over one thousand five injuries.

There arre many types of tornadoes.The average tornado is usually split up into categories based on the strength of the tornado.Most tornadoes,about 69%,are considered weak,which means they usually last between one minute and ten minutes,have winds less than one hundred and ten miles per hour, and the percent of deaths that occur during these is less than five percent. Strong tornadoes, about 29%, may last about twenty minutes, have winds between one hundred and ten and two hundred and five miles per hour, and the percent of deaths that are found are about thirty percent of all tornado deaths. The last category for tornadoes is violent ones. With these comes winds greater than two hundred and five miles per hour,they can last about an hour, and have seventy percent of all deaths from tornadoes.

Another type of tornado is known as a waterspout. This is a weak tornado that forms over warm water. They are most common along the Gulf Coast and southeastern states. In the western United States, they occur with cold late fall or late winter storms, during a time when you least except it to develop. They occasionally move inland becoming tornadoes that can cause a great deal of damage and many injuries.

Most tornadoes evolve from energy.
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