Wind and Plant Respiration

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Abstract
The hypothesis states that plants respire at a faster rate if they are exposed to wind, opposed to no wind. This was tested by putting one plant in water in front of a fan and the other plant in water, but with no fan. The results showed that the plant in front of the fan transpired more. However, since the plant blew cold air it affected the rate of transpiration and altered the experiment. Overall, this experiment supports the hypothesis that wind makes plants transpire more.

Hypothesis If a plant is exposed to wind for 24 hours, then it will transpire more than a plant that is not exposed to wind.

Materials/Methods •2 Test tubes
1 Graduated cylinder
Food coloring
Water
2 pieces of Lactuca sativa
1 Test tube rack
Fan
70 ml. of water was measured in a graduated cylinder and poured into a test tube. 7 drops of red food dye was added into the test tube. 70 ml. of water was measured in a graduated cylinder and poured into a second test tube. 7 drops of blue food dye was added into the second test tube. A piece of Lactuca sativa was placed into the red test tube so that only the stem was submerged in water. A second piece of Lactuca sativa (roughly the same size as the first) was placed into the blue test tube so that only the stem was submerged in water. The blue test tube was placed in a test tube rack in front of a fan set on low. The red test tube was placed in a test tube rack where there was no wind. After 24 hours both pieces of Lactuca sativa were taken out of the test tubes. The remaining water in the red test tube was poured into a graduated cylinder and measured. The remaining water in the blue test tube was poured into a graduated cylinder and measured.

Results

Effect of Wind on Transpiration
Exposed to Wind Not exposed to Wind...
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