Willy Wonka and Chocolate

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Benson Vanwagon
Chandra Howard
English 1b
Willy Wonka
Chocolate has been the coveted treat of the masses for hundreds of years. Milton Snavely Hershey created the world renowned Hershey milk chocolate bar in 1900. Since then chocolate had become nomenclature all around the world, it was given to children who behaved properly, used as a form of dessert, and even put on certain dinner dishes. There was no escaping the chocolate craze, the radio stations played commercials, posters lined the walls of grocery stores and billboards everywhere people went. The “icing on top” of this chocolaty situation was the film adaptation of the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl in 1971 titled Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. This great story about a boy who struggles and works hard for a few candy bars and wins a chance to tour the world famous Wonka Factory along with four other children. The Five children all were offered a large amount of money by Wonka’s competition Slugworth to steal the Everlasting Gob stopper. Throughout the movie mishaps happened to each of the children, some blew up like a balloon and others were considered bad eggs, but the ending was one that was never forgotten and how the boy who came from nothing won everything. Although this seemed like a basic children’s movie, there were plenty of underlying messages to be pondered such as, how powerful Wonka and his candy bars were, and what candy and media could do to the populous. The one thing that will be evaluated though is how biblical this movie was, due to its reference to the 7 deadly sins. The way that each child behaved and how each of them was punished is parallel to punishments implemented by the Bible. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory depict several deadly sins through each of the golden ticket winners and that Charlie Bucket represents the virtuous heart that human beings should emulate.

The visual aspect of the movie had a major influence on the topic of this...
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