William Wordsworth „the World Is Too Much with Us…”,

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William Wordsworth deals with a very contemporary issue in his poem „The world is too much with us…”, which is kind of surprising, because the author of this poem lived in the 19th century and it seems that back then people had already realized that human beings are destroying Earth and they take nature for granted. I guess Wordsworth wrote this poem to try making people aware of their actions and its outcomes.

The speaker of this poem is a lyrical I, as you can see in line 11 where the poet uses the first person: “So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,” and also in line 12 where he talks about “me”. But the speaker also mentions a certain “us” with which he refers to us people. We, the human beings, are also the addressee’s in this poem. The lyrical I explains to us that we, including himself, do not appreciate nature as much as we should be and we do not think that it is special. It is hard to tell where the speaker is at the moment of expressing his opinion. But he mentions a sea and wind, which might also mean that the lyrical I is outside at the sea, where it is windy and already night, because “the Sea…bares her bosom to the moon;”. (see line 5) But it could also be that this is just a metaphor that came to his mind and it does not have to do anything with the place he is at the moment of speaking.

This poem was written by the English poet, William Wordsworth, in the beginning of the 19th century. Since that was the time when the industrial revolution took place, I think it must have had a big impact on Wordsworth’s poem. Maybe it was even the initial point for him to write this poem. The two main topics in his sonnet are the importance of nature and religion or God. He expresses his opinion about us being affected by materialism which makes us unable of appreciating nature that was a gift from God. We just forget about the little, meaningful things in life. To be able to understand this poem better, I am going to analyze the content of this poem in detail and go through the fourteen lines and describe what Wordsworth’s ideas might have been and how he expresses them. The romantic poet chose a very good title - “The world is enough with us…” - for his poem, which the reader can understand easily and he gets an idea of the main topic of this sonnet. It shows that Wordsworth is thinking about what went wrong with the world. With the three periods at the end of the title Wordsworth pretty much makes the title everlasting because you can add whatever you think fits to extend or finish the sentence and you can even use it nowadays, a couple decades later. In the first line he starts off with “THE world…”, this is the only time that the poet writes an article in upper case letters. I thought about what he wants to express with that, and I came to the conclusion that he probably wants to say that there is only one world, and that one is ours but we are making too much out of it. We should have just kept it the way it was instead of expanding it with all our new inventions. The next part is “late and soon,/Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;”(see line 1 and 2) with which he probably refers to the past and the future of capitalism. We did not appreciate God’s gift, the nature, in the past and we will not learn to value it in the future, materialistic existence is the most important for us and nothing else. We are spending money on expensive things and getting everything we want, but nature would give us so much more and we would not have to spend a single penny for it. Money is not the most important thing in our lives. The poet tries to tell us that we do not need all those things, because nature is already ours and we should start realizing that and making use of what we are already owning: “Little we see in Nature that is ours;” Wordsworth sees the relationship between humans and nature, and since we are the ones that own it, nature is helpless against our force. But nature is more than just...
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