William Blake's "The Tyger"

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  • Topic: William Blake, Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Metropolitana di Napoli
  • Pages : 3 (1042 words )
  • Download(s) : 205
  • Published : October 25, 2010
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Jon Thrower
English 132
27 September 2010

William Blake’s Search for Meaning in “The Tyger”

This Poem was written as a part of a collection of poems entitled “Songs of Experience” which was a kind of sequel to the book “Songs of Innocence”. This is important to know ygerbecause, the book “Songs of Innocence” is written from the point of view of a young child. Whereas the poems in “Songs of Experience” are written form the point of view of a child who is starting to learn concepts like fear and envy. The tone of this poem one of fear and also wonder it’s like the poet is fearful but also in awe of the tiger. In the First stanza Blake uses the word “night” to create fear. (Line 2) Then In the rest of poem is used to describe his wonder in the tiger.

The first stanza starts off with “Tyger! Tyger!” (Line 1) Blake does this to create a sense of fear. It’s almost as if he trying to alert us to this tiger like it is right here. Then in line 2 he writes “In the forest of the night” I remember when I was a kid going camping and being in the forest at night can be pretty unsettling. When Blake says this he are describing the place where the “Tyger” lives this paints this creature as something to be feared. Then he goes on to say in lines 3 and 4 “What immortal hand or eye / could frame thy fearful symmetry?” he is asking what could create such terror, or is there anything that can be greater than this epitome of evil called “the Tyger”

The “Tyger” in this poem epitomizes evil based on the way Blake describes him. In lines 5 and 6 Blake says “In what distant deeps or skies / Burnt the fire of thine eyes?” this implies that this creature was formed in some faraway place which gives it a somewhat mystical characteristic. Also when you read “Burnt the fire of thine eyes?” (Line 6) you get this picture of eyes so intense that they seem to burn with fire. In line 7 “On what wings dare he aspire?” this is used to illustrate how courageous the creator of the...
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