Wilbour Plaque

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Wilbour
 Plaque
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 The
 Wilbour
 Plaque
 is
 named
 after
 Charles
 Edwin
 Wilbour
 a
 Egyptologist
 that
 
came
 across
 the
 slab
 in
 1881,
 in
 Egypt.
 The
 Wilbour
 Plaque
 is
 made
 out
 of
  Limestone
 rock.
 Measuring
 6
 and
 3/16
 x
 8
 11/16
 x
 1
 5/8
 inches.
 The
 stone
 slab
 is
  engraved
 with
 two
 characters
 focused
 on
 their
 heads.
 The
 head
 on
 the
 far
 left
 reads
  to
 be
 an
 illustration
 of
 a
 king,
 shown
 through
 the
 demonstration
 of
 the
 headdress
  being
 worn.
 The
 other
 figure’s
 head
 is
 thought
 to
 be
 of
 a
 Queen
 figure,
 represented
  by
 her
 crown.
 This
 piece
 suggests
 a
 system
 of
 hierarchy
 that
 was
 present
 in
 this
 era.
  It
 also
 depicts
 the
 knowledge
 and
 innovates
 of
 the
 peoples
 in
 terms
 of
 their
 methods
  to
 provide
 proper
 representation
 when
 teaching
 students.
 Overall
 theme
 of
 this
 slab
  generates
 around
 the
 time
 period
 it
 was
 created
 in,
 the
 Amarna
 period.
 The
 sketches
  suggest
 the
 idea
 of
 Royalty
 and
 creation
 that
 began
 to
 grow
 and
 shift
 into
 near
 the
  end
 of
 that
 time
 period.
 The
 function
 of
 this
 piece
 was
 used
 as
 an
 educational
  method.
 There
 is
 a
 hole
 at
 the
 top
 of
 the
 slab,
 used
 to
 hang
 the
 piece
 on
 the
 wall
 so
  beginner
 artists
 could
 use
 it
 as
 reference
 when
 being
 taught
 by
 sculptors.
 
 

 

 
 
 
 

Sources:
  Macdonald,
 First.
 How
 to
 Recognize
 Egyptian
 Art.
 Italy,
 Rizzoli:
 Macdonald
 Education
  Ltd,
 1978:
 40-­‐41.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 This
 reading
 provides
 explanation
 of
 symbolism
 and
 its
 representation
 within
 the
  Egyptian
 culture.
 The
 author
 provides
 knowledge
 on
 material
 use,
 common
 styling
  and
 references
 that
 were
 common
 throughout
 this
 time
 period.
 
 
 
  Petrie,
 Flinders.
 The
 Arts
 and
 Crafts
 of
 Ancient
 Egypt.
 EdinBurgh,
 London:
 T.N.Foulis,
  Ltd,
 1923:
 69-­‐83.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 This
 novel
 depicts
 detailed
 explanation
 of
 the
 findings
 for
 stone
 workings
 in
 the
  different
 dynasty.
 Continuing
 to
 discuss
 how
 the
 Egyptians
 harvested
 their
  materials
 from
 nature
 like
 granite
 and
 quartz.
 An
 in
 depth
 step
 by
 step
 method
 of
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