Wikipedia's Credibility

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  • Topic: Encyclopædia Britannica, Wikipedia, Encyclopedia
  • Pages : 2 (709 words )
  • Download(s) : 118
  • Published : February 10, 2013
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One person gives another person some information on a certain subject. That person, with his newfound knowledge, then tells another person that same information but adds a few things here and there. Already some information that may or may not have been true has been distorted or changed from one person to the next. The last person that received the information is now giving the author that piece of information and also adds some information he deems important. How is the author supposed to trust that this information that was not only passed on from person to person, but also changed as the information was passed on, is correct? This is what Wikipedia is; unverified information that can be posted on the internet and then open to have information added by anybody with an internet connection. There is a webpage on Wikipedia titled “Wikipedia: Ten things you may not know about Wikipedia”. However, when you go on that webpage there are only eight things they tell you about. A credible source would not have a glaring mistake like that on their webpage where they are explaining who they are and what they do. In addition, on that same webpage Wikipedia tells you that “you can’t actually change anything in Wikipedia, you can only add to it” (Wikipedia, 2012). A credible source does not allow anyone to add to their information. This may not seem like a big deal to some people but if the author wanted to, he can go on to an article in Wikipedia on someone famous like Justin Bieber, and change where it says “Justin Bieber, born March 1, 1994” to “Justin Bieber, originally born a female on March 1, 1994”. The author is not changing any of the text in the article but by adding text the author can post false information. Granted, Wikipedia does look for vandalism like this but one will not know if what they are reading is correct or is waiting to be corrected. Brock Read wrote an article titled “Can Wikipedia Ever Make the Grade” in which he had...
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