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Domestic violence
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Domestic violence|
Classification and external resources|
eMedicine| article/805546|
MeSH| D017579|

Family law|
Marriage & Similar status|
* Marriage  * Types of marriages * Prenuptial agreement  * Cohabitation * Civil union  * Domestic partnership| Dissolution of marriage|
* Divorce  * Annulment  * Alimony * Void and Voidable marriage  * Separation * Parenting plan  * Residence (ENG) * Parental rights  * Parenting coordinator (USA)| Parent legal|

* Paternity  * Legitimacy  * Child custody * Legal guardian  * Adoption  * Child support * Contact & Visitation  * Grandparent visitation| Child legal|
* U.N. Rights of the Child  * Children's rights * Emancipation  * Foster care  * Ward * Parental child abduction| Conflict of laws|
* Conflict of laws  * Divorce  * Marriage * Nullity  * International child abduction * Hague Convention (child abduction)| Related areas|
* Family  * Adultery  * Paternity fraud  * Bigamy * CAFCASS (ENG)  * CPS (USA)  * Child abuse * Domestic violence  * Incest  * Child-selling| * v  * t  * e|
Domestic violence, also known as domestic abuse, spousal abuse, battering, family violence, and intimate partner violence (IPV), is defined as a pattern of abusive behaviors by one partner against another in an intimate relationship such as marriage, dating, family, or cohabitation.[1] Domestic violence, so defined, has many forms, including physical aggression or assault (hitting, kicking, biting, shoving, restraining, slapping, throwing objects), or threats thereof; sexual abuse; emotional abuse; controlling or domineering; intimidation; stalking; passive/covert abuse (e.g., neglect); and economic deprivation.[1][2] Alcohol consumption[3] and mental illness[4] can be co-morbid with abuse, and present additional challenges in eliminating domestic violence. Awareness, perception, definition and documentation of domestic violence differs widely from country to country, and from era to era. Domestic violence and abuse is not limited to obvious physical violence. Domestic violence can also mean endangerment, criminal coercion, kidnapping, unlawful imprisonment, trespassing, harassment, and stalking.[5] Contents  [hide]  * 1 Definitions * 1.1 Government definitions * 1.2 Dynamics classification * 1.3 Intimate partner violence types * 1.4 Other * 2 Forms * 2.1 Physical * 2.2 Sexual * 2.3 Emotional * 2.4 Verbal * 2.5 Economic * 3 Effects * 3.1 On children * 3.2 Physical * 3.3 Psychological * 3.4 Financial * 3.5 Long-term * 3.6 On responders * 4 Causes * 4.1 Biological * 4.2 Psychological * 4.3 Jealousy * 4.4 Behavioral * 4.5 Social theories * 5 Gender aspects of abuse * 5.1 Violence against women * 5.2 Violence against men * 5.3 Same-sex relationships * 6 Cycle of abuse * 7 Management * 7.1 Medical response * 7.2 Law enforcement * 7.3 Counseling for person affected * 7.4 Counseling for offenders * 7.5 Prevention and intervention * 8 Pregnancy * 9 Prognosis * 10 Epidemiology * 11 History * 12 See also * 13 References * 14 Bibliography * 15 Further reading * 16 External links| -------------------------------------------------

[edit]Definitions
According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary definition, domestic violence is: "the inflicting of physical injury by one family or household member on another; also: a repeated / habitual pattern of such behavior."[6] The term "intimate partner violence" (IPV) is often used synonymously with domestic abuse/domestic violence. Family violence is a broader definition, often used to include child abuse, elder abuse, and other violent acts between...
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