Why the Normans Won the Battle of Hastings

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Why the Normans Won the Battle of Hastings
There was a huge battle in 1066 called the battle of Hastings. There were two great leaders, called William, Duke of Normandy and Harold, King of England. William tried to invade England and beat Harold, so became king. There were three main reasons that William won. William was well prepared and very determined to invade England. He left Normandy with a huge fleet of 700 ships, carrying 5000 foot soldiers and 2000 knights on horseback. This shows he was well prepared as he had to travel all over southern Europe to find men, as Normandy’s army was not that big. He offered the men money and a place in the heaven (as he had the pope on his side) to any men who joined his army. The Bayeux tapestry also shows his men working hard to build ships, make and carry armour, weapons and supplies to the sea. He must have been very prepared to organize all his men like that. William’s chaplain (priest) wrote in 1071 that, “ Some of the greatest lords of Normandy argued with Duke William against the idea of sending an army to England. They said it was too difficult and would cost more than Normandy could afford.” But William was so determined he wouldn’t let anyone stop him, not even the Lords of Normandy. He had to sail across the channel as well, and this was very dangerous at the time furthermore proving he was determined. Harold was very unlucky.

When he heard William was going to invade, Harold rounded up his army and positioned them at the south coast, waiting and ready for battle. They waited and waited but William didn’t come. William couldn’t come. The wind was blowing the wrong way (south) so he couldn’t sail up to fight Harold. But Harold’s army was getting restless, so Harold had to let them go back to their daily lives. Without warning, a man called Harald Hardraada...
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