Why Do Living Things Need Energy?

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Why Do Living Things Need Energy?

All living things need energy to survive. Nearly all the energy for life comes from the sun.

Autotrophs are organisms that make their own food.

There are two laws of Thermodynamics:
First Law- The law of conservation of energy, which states that energy can be converted from one form to another, but it CANNOT be created or destroyed. •Second Law- States that energy cannot be converted without the loss of usable energy IMPORTANT TERMS

Energy- the ability to do work
Thermodynamics- the study of the flow and transformation of energy in the universe Metabolism- all the chemical reactions in a cell
Photosynthesis- is the anabolic pathway in which light energy from the sun is converted to chemical energy Cellular Respiration- catabolic pathway in which organic molecules are broken down to release energy Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)- the most important biological molecule that provides chemical energy Thylakoids- flattened saclike membranes that are arranged in stacks Granum- Stacks that involve thylakoids

Stroma- the fluid filled space that is outside the Granum
Pigment- light-absorbing colored molecules
NADP+- when ferrodoxin transfers
Calvin Cycle- energy is stored in organic molecules, such as glucose Rusbico- Conversion enzyme
Anaerobic Process- Does not require oxygen
Aerobic Respiration- Includes the Krebs cycle and includes electron transport Aerobic Process- Require oxygen
Glycolysis- Glucose is broken down into the cytoplasm
Krebs Cycle- Series of reactions in which pyruvate is broken down into carbon dioxide Fermentation- Occur when the cytoplasm is producing a small amount of ATP
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