Why and How Did the Roman Republic Fall? Answer the Same for the Roman Empire.

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Why and how did the Roman Republic fall? Answer the same for the Roman Empire.
The Roman Republic was the major stronghold for centuries. Encompassing the Mediterranean and much of Europe, and even having influence throughout Egypt and beyond, it was well understood that Rome was not to be messed with. No civilization could ever topple such a well-organized and technologically advanced society such as Rome. No civilization, that is, other than its own self. Pride, revenge, and greed influenced key decisions that pried at the few loose ends that Rome had. Generals, soldiers, and the Senate alike destroyed the foundations on which the Roman Republic was built on, and the nation collapsed from the inside out. In a perfect world, Rome had an excellent, impermeable structure, but it was no match for human nature.

The major failures of the Republic began with corruption in the Senate. Members were bribed by rich merchants and noble men to pass laws in favor of their profits and the peasant class’s demise. Those who weren’t victim of bribery were only so because they had corrupted themselves, in office only to insure self-profit. Although it was denied, it was well known throughout Rome that the citizen’s vote no longer mattered, and that the Senate was corrupted. Furthermore, the Rome had become too large for the Senate to control. The government system was well adapted for controlling Italy, but controlling the vast Mediterranean territory required a very active, adaptive, and productive government, and the corrupted Senate could not keep up with the issues within its mass territory.

Although the Roman government was highly unstable, it was not in fear of collapse until the Roman military turned in on itself. The Roman military became a professional class of soldiers lead by rich aristocrats, paid in gifts of land or money. These soldiers tended to ignore their generals’ disregard to constitutional restraints, more worried about collecting a small fortune for...
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