Who Killed Jfk

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On November 22, 1963, President John Fitzgerald Kennedy was assassinated. The 35th president of the United States of America was shot in Dallas, Texas while in a presidential motorcade. There has been much controversy surrounding his death in regards to both the possible shooter and to the tampering of evidence. Everything from the CIA to JFK’s limousine driver has been part of various theories as to who really killed Kennedy. Officially, Kennedy was shot and killed by Lee Harvey Oswald but many people believe that there were multiple gunmen involved in the assassination.

Oswald is known as the man who killed the President based on the official word from the government. He had been hired by the Texas School Book Depository a month prior to the assassination. This job was instrumental in the assassination as it allowed him to overlook the motorcade from the book depository and shoot the President with little trouble. He flees the crime scene but is eventually caught in the Texas Theatre after the police were tipped off by a man who believed Oswald was behaving suspiciously. He was charged with shooting a police officer and was transferred to jail. Jack Ruby, a nightclub operator with alleged ties to organised crime, killed Oswald during the transfer. The only man who knew who killed JFK was now dead and Ruby shortly followed as he suffered from cancer of the lungs, brain and liver. These deaths paved the way for conspiracy theories as all the loose ends were tied while questions remained unanswered. In an effort to dispel rumours and provide a consensus, President Lyndon B. Johnson established The President's Commission on the Assassination of President Kennedy which was known informally as the Warren Commission. The commission concluded that both Oswald and Ruby acted alone. The goal to dispel the conspiracies surrounding the assassination backfired as their findings were found to be controversial and were criticised for their methods and important omissions....
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