Who's to Blame?

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Who’s to Blame?

The world is full of everyday crimes carried on by criminals who should face the consequences of their actions, no matter what. The people of Rome are debating over who should be blamed for Julius Caesar’s assassination. The majority of the people believe the conspirators are responsible for Caesar’s death. This is a logical accusation for they are the ones that killed him, but the ones who should really be blamed and punished are Gaius Cassius and Marcus Brutus. These two vile men led the conspirators in the plan to assassinate Caesar.

Cassius and Brutus were the ones who carried out the actual assassination. Caesar’s death was unacceptable in every way. These men, along with the conspirators, stabbed Caesar thirty-three times. Thirty-three! Was that really necessary? They had no authority, no right to kill him, yet they still did. They did what they thought was the right thing to do, not what the people of Rome thought was right. These men killed him because they thought it was the best for Rome. As we all know, death should not be used to solve personal problems. These men had personal problems because they feared to be under Caesar’s rule, so they decided to get rid of him instead. They thought Caesar didn’t deserve to be crowned because according to them he was a “coward” that pleaded for help because he couldn’t do heroic things on his own. Cassius once compared Caesar to a sick girl crying for water (I, ii, 118- 131). This was not the way to go, yet they did and they made themselves and the people believe it was acceptable. Cassius and Brutus should face the consequences because committing crime under the law is highly unacceptable.

In a crime, the leaders are responsible for the outcomes and punishment. In Caesar’s death, the leaders were Cassius and Brutus. Cassius was mostly responsible for persuading the men to join his plan. It was mainly his idea to get rid of Caesar. Cassius thought he was superior to Caesar and thus, thought...
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