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White Noise Substituted Reality

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White Noise Substituted Reality

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Substituted Reality through Simulacrum French sociologist, Jean Baudrillard states, "Simulation is no longer that of a territory, a referential being, or a substance. It is the generation by models of a real without origin or

reality: a hyperreal…It is no longer a question of imitation, nor duplication, nor even parody. It is a question of substituting the signs of the real for the real”. (Simulacra and Simulations).

The concept of simulacrum is most closely defined as something that replaces reality with its representation. Don Delillo uses the concept of simulacrum in his book, White Noise to help Delillo does

illuminate how modern culture has substituted reality with manufactured reality.

this through a variety of key components in the book including the SIMUVAC program, the most photographed barn in America, and the effects of Nyodene D and Dylar. SIMUVAC is hired to clean up the aftermath of “the airborne toxic event. ” SIMUVAC represents the ideal simulacrum by claiming the emergency first run through in the toxic event as practice for an actual simulation. One SIMUVAC employee states, “We don't have our victims Using real emergencies

laid out where we'd want them if this was an actual simulation” (135).

as practice for simulations rather than simulations as practice for real events directly supports the theory that the postmodern society “substitutes signs of the real for the real”. The real emergency is constantly referred to as an exercise, “there’s a lot of polishing we still have to do. But that’s what this exercise is all about” (135). Referencing real scenarios as exercises for

simulations further supports the fact that modern culture is now substituting reality with manufactured reality. The creation of Nyodene D supports the theory of the blind following of science society has adopted today. Modern advancements are often not understood by the common man. This

creates a sense of blind acceptance to this technology. Too much...