Whistleblowing

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Definition: Whistleblowing occurs when a member of an organization goes outside of the normal lines of authority in order to accuse the organization (or key personnel) of wrongdoing. On the face of it, whistleblowing involves disloyalty -- however well-meaning -- to one's institution. So it requires justification. When is whistleblowing justified? Serious harm is involved; The whistleblower has already expressed his or her concerns to his/her immediate superior; The whistleblower has exhausted other channels within the organization; De George further suggested that blowing the whistle might be not merely justified, but morally required, if 2 additional criteria are met: The whistleblower has convincing, documented evidence; The whistleblower has good reason to believe that going public will actually bring about change, and thereby prevent serious harm. 1) Talk to supervisor 2) Talk to family members (this is important because the stress placed on those who blow the whistle is tremendous and can have a severe impact on family life) 3) Take it to the next level

4) Contact company ethics officer or ombudsman
5) Consider taking it outside your chain of command
6) Go outside the company
7) Leave the company
It’s important to tell the family because they are the people you trust the most and because whistle blowing may not affect only you but also your family ie. Being fired or harassed and it is important the family is behind you if you are going to proceed. The Ethics of Whistleblowing

In their analyses of whistleblowing, both Bowie (1982) and Bok (1980) emphasize that an employee has a significant obligation of loyalty to a company. Bok, for instance, writes that the “whistleblower hopes to stop the game; but since he is neither referee nor coach, and since he blows the whistle on his own team, his act is seen as a violation of loyalty.” For both,...
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