What You Pawn I Will Redeem

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I decided to write about Jackson Jackson and his epic Journey in “What you Pawn I will Redeem.” The reason I choose to write this passage because I feel this to be inspiring in some way. I will refer to both literal homelessness, cultural homelessness as a Spokane Indian, and what the title means to me.

Jackson living on the cold wet streets of Seattle notices many things in his journey to desired items. Jackson manages to receive money from people out of pity and they decide to try to help him. In this passage he receives these offering very often. The whole passage revolves around the goal he attempts to accomplish. His goal is to get his grandmothers Regalia that were stolen from his family roughly a decade ago. He found this item in a pawnshop in Seattle and the pawnbroker tells Jackson if he makes $200 he can have it.

In Jackson’s journey a police officer gives him twenty dollars. He started off with five dollars in his pockets. He begins his journey by buying a lottery ticket and wins a large sum of money. After he claims all his earning he decided to go to the bar and buy everyone drinks. Jackson ends up getting drunk but shared his earnings with everyone he knew and didn’t know. He goes back to the Pawn Broker, and the broker asked him how much do you have? Jackson says twenty dollars. A little shy of the two hundred he needed before. The pawnbroker asked Jackson did you work hard for it? Jackson replies with a Yes.

Jackson was curious to why he had given him the Regalia even though he was far from being able to afford it. The pawnbroker’s replies with a statement of because you seemed to really want it. At first Jackson was slightly dumbfounded but later on became very happy.

Jackson’s cultural homelessness seems too irrelevant to most people but I would disagree. I feel that the Spokane Indians like all other Native American tribes are culturally connected to a history of dispossession, forced removal, and lost lands. In this way...
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