“What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

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In technique and material, I think that no American had ever offered a more moving analysis of the racial situation of America than Fredrick Douglass did at Rochester, New York on July 5, 1852. I have noticed a lot of things about how there are so many things that people don’t think about or choose to think about. Fredrick Douglass did something that not many people would be able to do today. I thought that it was clever of Fredrick Douglass to use this great opportunity to let America know that this is a celebration of White independence, not Black independence. He let them know that the "white" Fourth of July has a completely different meaning to the Black men and women who are still slaves for the white men who yet gain their freedom. Therefore, Fourth of July signified nothing to them. It is the White independence, not the Black. That is also what I think the title of Fredrick Douglass’s speech mean. While reading this, I thought of how selfish the “Whites” used to be by just worrying about themselves and worriless of how there are still people who is still being treated unequally. I felt that that anyone who supported slavery should pictured themselves being slaves and see how wonderful it is to be someone else property and be degraded by them. Frederick Douglass’ Fourth of July oration is an exceptionally moving and eye-opening speech. This speech is probably the most powerful rhetorical masterpiece ever made. He is one of the greatest figures in American history. This speech is one that will definitely live in the heart of any person that was affected by slavery.
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